5th Sunday of Easter / B April 29, 2018

 

Acts 9:26-31; 1 Jn 3:18-24; Jn 15:1-8.

We know that we should obey Jesus’ commandments. But what are they? Rules? Laws? Are they complicated? Are they difficult to understand? Do we need to study the Bible day and night? Do they concern our everyday life?

The second reading for this weekend lays it out simply, saying “And (God’s) commandment is this: we should believe in the name of his Son, Jesus Christ, and love one another just as he commanded us. Those who keep his commandment remain in him, and he in them, and the way we know that he remains in us is from the Spirit he gave us.” (1 John 3:23-24). In calling ourselves Christians, our commandment is to love one another and trust in Jesus Christ. We do this just as when Jesus walked the earth. Loving one another has a way of expanding because the world needs our love. As we learn to open our hearts, the Spirit cares for us according to John bearing fruit.

In the first reading, after his conversion, Paul tries to join the community of believers. However, Paul has a problem that follows him his whole life and affects some Christians. Paul is combative. In the New Testament combativeness can cause trouble and misunderstanding. John the Baptist, son of a temple priest, leaves the Temple and baptizes in the River Jordan. Even there his enemies follow leading to arrest and execution.

The Apostle James, called “Son of Thunder,” is the first of the twelve killed in Jerusalem. Steven combats and challenges the Jews and is stoned to death. Paul combats Christians before his conversion and “they were afraid of him” (Acts 9:26). In today’s reading, Paul combats the Hellenists (secularized Jews). Later he combats Peter, James the brother of Jesus, John Mark (possibly the writer of the Gospel), Barnabas, diaspora Jews, Greeks, and other Christians. Paul was faithful, insightful, sometimes wrong, often divisive, and on fire for his faith.

Jesus was not so combative, and because of this people were drawn to him. They listened when he asked them to soften their hearts. He was both adored and rejected. He healed, he fed, and then he asked for a change of heart. The healings and feedings were admired and seen as wonders, but his call to a change of heart was often rejected. So he invited and brought to himself a special group of twelve. Even with them the deeper call to a change of heart caused them to betray and abandon him.

The Gospel comes back to the central theme of trusting in Jesus, connected to him with the image of the vine. Being attached to vine produces fruit. Though they turned away from him the resurrection at Easter reattached them to Jesus the vine and they produced much fruit. Believing in the resurrection is our invitation to become attached to the vine. We do it by trusting in Jesus and loving one another. And from it we will produce much fruit.

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About Brothers and Sisters of Love

The Mission of Brothers and Sisters of Love is to be a visible sign of Jesus’ Love, Peace, and Presence to the poor in gang-infested neighborhoods in Chicago and to be a bridge between gangs & the poor with the Church. This is done by: 1. Loving everyone 2. Trusting in God 3. Forgiving everyone everything 4. Never being afraid.
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